Keyword Research

Top Keyword Research Techniques - See What Experts Say

These keyword research techniques shared by Top SEO experts of 2016 are not those old school shitty techniques. Some of these experts are new to the industry like Ryan is a new guy and he is a genius.

Have you ever wondered how the REAL SEO experts do keyword research?

Have you ever wondered how the REAL SEO experts do keyword research?

As you have probably noticed, the SEO industry has been flooded with massive “expert” roundups.1

I’m guilty of contributing to these…

BUT, that’s why I decided to redeem myself and bring on REAL SEO experts who have successful SEO agencies or have a proven track record of success.

These guys don’t just say they are “experts”, they actually are.

I chose seven experts including myself to answer the following questions about keyword research:
“1. What is your “go-to” strategy for finding the best keywords for a campaign?”
“2. And what criteria do you use to determine the “quality” of a keyword?”
These experts are in no particular order.

Enjoy:

1. Nick Eubanks

SEO Blogger at SEOauv.com

 

1. What is your “go-to” strategy for finding the best keywords for a campaign?

My go to strategy for finding the keywords for any campaign is first scrape the entire universe of suggested terms for every possible variation related to a small set of seed terms.

Then manually reviewing them for modifier patterns, things like specific verbs or adjectives that provide more insight into intent. Then I create buckets; usually 4-5 based on the topics that I’m able to group the keywords into.

Themes quickly emerge and I’m able to then go out and start exploring what content might look like for these types of topics.

Once I have a sense of the content I can figure out who the tangential audiences are and can think of how to maximize the appeal of content that fits within the keyword set.

Performing this content research also lends direction as to who, where, and how I might promote this content, what format that content should take, and who’s site it should live on.

2. And what criteria do you use to determine the “quality” of a keyword?

Determining the quality of a keyword for me is pretty straightforward;

  • Does the implied intent of this term match with the goals of the business or website?
  • Does the keyword have at least 5 long tail variations each with at least 50 searches/month?
  • Are there pages currently ranking on page 1 with less than 10 links to the individual ranking URL’s?

2. Jayson DeMers

Founder & CEO of AudienceBloom

 

What is your "go-to" strategy for finding the best keywords for a campaign?

Well, the whole idea of search “keywords” has changed a lot in the past decade.

Stuffing keywords and trying to rank for specific words and phrases simply isn’t useful anymore.

That, combined with the fact that Google Analytics and Google's Keyword Tool in AdWords tend to hide data, means if you’re using a keyword research strategy from 2010, you're not going to be successful.

For me, searcher intent is my biggest priority in selecting keywords and topics to optimize for.

I usually start with a general topic related to the site in question—let's say "online marketing"—and use a variety of different tools to help point me toward what people need most. I look at online blogs and forums, particularly at topics with lots of recent traction, I look at Google Trends to see what people are searching for in the past month or two, and I plug myself into social media conversations to see what people are talking about.

From there, I usually have a pretty big list of potential content topics, general subjects, and phrases that I’ll want to target in my campaign. I use AdWords to find information on search volume, and weed out topics that aren’t going to be a good long-term fit.

At that point, I use factors like degree of difficulty/competition and potential value to find my top picks.

And what criteria do you use to determine the "quality" of a keyword?

For me, quality is about value—getting the most traction with as few obstacles as possible.

For that I need keywords that are visibly popular with searchers (which you can see in Google Trends, social media conversations, etc.), statistically reasonable (based on search volume), non-competitive (see who else is ranking for a query and how strong their domain/page authorities are), and valuable (topics that could feasibly win you good leads, direct conversions, or a higher reputation).

That’s a lot to look for at once, but popularity and business value are probably my top two considerations.

3. Sujan Patel

Marketing Blogger at SujanPatel.com

What is your "go-to" strategy for finding the best keywords for a campaign?

My approach is to find the highest volume keywords that my site could rank for in 6 and 12 and 18+ months.

I'll also purchase intent and difficulty into consideration and sort them into those 3 buckets.

The key is to be realistic and grab some short term success to justify further attention.

The last thing I look at is how the keywords (or theme of keywords) is trending and if the demand is increasing or decreasing.

The few tools I use are UberSuggest, SEMrush (my fav and go to tool), Google keyword planner and trends. I also use Open Site Explorer to size up the competition.

And what criteria do you use to determine the "quality" of a keyword?

To me the ultimate quality guideline is purchase intent. I often test doing PPC for my target keywords to validate intent.

4. Nathan Gotch

Founder & CEO of Gotch SEO

Did you think I would have an "expert" roundup on my blog without including myself? 😛

What is your "go-to" strategy for finding the best keywords for a campaign?

I always start my research by looking at industry forums.

A simple search string like "your niche + forums" will work.

Go into the forum and look at the main categories.

These will likely act as content categories for your site. After you have scoped out the forum on the surface level, jump into one of the sections. See what questions people are asking and what problems they are having. This intel will guide your content and keyword targeting.

Toss the ideas you found into the Google Keyword Planner or Long Tail Pro to see the search volume. If you don't have Long Tail Pro, then get one check out this website for best Discounts: http://longtailpro4.com/

Picking a keyword to target depends on two factors:

  • The authority of your website
  • The competition

If your site isn't authoritative, then you should focus on uncompetitive keywords first. Long tail keywords with a search volume between 100 – 500 is a good place to start in most scenarios.

And what criteria do you use to determine the "quality" of a keyword?

A "quality" keyword I would create content for has to meet this criteria:

The keyword must have more than 100 searches per month according to the Google Keyword Planner

The keyword must drive revenue for the business in one way or another: some keywords drive direct revenue like "pink nike shoes". While others can send traffic into a sales funnel like "backlinks". I always ask this question: how can this keyword grow my revenue? If you can't think of way, then skip it.

The keyword competition needs to be low if the site has low authority. If the site has some authority, then it can target more challenging head keywords. However, targeting only long-tail keywords is a good policy for ALL websites.

To determine the competition level, I quickly examine:

  • PA, DA: if every site has massive PA and DA, then it might be a keyword to avoid. You especially want to look at PA because that is based on the links and authority going to that specific page that is ranking.
  • Big brand dominance: if the first page is overwhelmed by big brands, then I might reconsider the keyword. You can beat big brands, if your site is more relevant, but it isn't easy.
  • Keyword optimization: I quickly examine the title and META description for every site on the first page to see if they are optimized for the keyword I'm going after. If they aren't, then that's typically a green light (if it meets the other criteria above)
  • "Weak" pages ranking well: I define "weak" pages as forums thread, Q&A threads, PDFs, web 2.0s, and videos. If you see any of these pages ranking, then it's an indication that it's a low competition niche.

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